Paving The Way To Progress

Share This Insight:

Imagine a place where the morning commute resembles a chaotic game of bumper cars, and rush hour feels like a never-ending maze. 

Without a comprehensive general plan to pave the way, transportation infrastructure can quickly turn into a mishmash of disconnected routes riddled with potholes as future development occurs.  This can lead to traffic gridlocks and other obstacles that stifles the community’s economic growth, frustrates residents, and transforms daily life into a symphony of honking horns and exasperated sighs.

General plans by nature are designed to be the roadmap that guides a community’s journey toward its envisioned destination. It empowers communities to make informed decisions, promotes sustainable and coordinated development, and ultimately contributes to the creation of vibrant, livable, and resilient places.

A well-crafted transportation and traffic circulation element of a general plan helps pave the way for things such as locations of future roads, intersections, public transit hubs, as well as outlines general principles, strategies, and objectives which ensures flows of traffic are not just functional but also works of art.

The future of transportation and traffic circulation elements of a general plan are a dynamic landscape where innovations like autonomous vehicles, smart infrastructure, and sustainable modes of transit can be discussed. Communities who make a conscious efforts to develop a robust transportation and traffic circulation element arguably can anticipate these types of changes better than those who choose not too by providing flexibility to embrace future-ready concepts such as electric vehicle charging stations, dedicated bike lanes, etc., propelling them into the future.

If your community is not planning comprehensively for transportation and traffic circulation in your general plan, your community may find itself now or in the future struggling with traffic congestion, reduced or limited accessibility to essential services, ineffective or insufficient modes of public transportation, impacts or hindrances to economic development, or worse, may find itself dealing with critical life safety hazards.

If the above reasons are not enough on their own to persuade your community into adopting a transportation and traffic circulation element for your general plan, then we’ll guilt you into it by reminding you that §10-9a-403 of Utah State Code (as amended) requires all municipalities in Utah to have one.

Need Advice?

Call Rural Community Consultants today to get expert advice and guidance on developing or updating your community’s general plan today.  

Want to Learn More?

Check out our online training modules here! Note:  civiclinQ is able to provide access to specific land use training modules free of charge courtesy of the Utah Office of the Property Rights Ombudsman.

More Insights

Community Design

Paving The Way To Progress

Imagine a place where the morning commute resembles a chaotic game of bumper cars, and rush hour feels like a never-ending maze.  Without a comprehensive

Read More
Schedule A Demo
Name(Required)
Upon submitting this form, you will be redirected to another page to choose a time to meet with one of our team members.

Get Started Today

Already Have An Account?

Login

Register